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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
to face a changing environment? >> you know, i think, arguably, it's a hard question to answer, but i think arguably more than any other place in the country, i mean, new york geography has been destiny for new york, but i think more so for here. i think we're moving now into a new phase of its history. we have been for some time, but i think that sandy underscores it really, really dramatically. with san francisco and hong kong, one of the three greatest deepwater ports in the world. that's why new york became new york. a thousand ships. the dutch could see it in the 17th century, could ride and anchor in new york harbor. anchor in new york harbor. new yorkers had an extraordinary ability to leverage from the start, that geography. so i'm not content with the geography that nature had given them in the early 19th century. they went out and built the eerie canal, a 363-mile ditch that connected new york harbor and the great lakes. so not only do they have the greatest natural port in the western hemisphere, everything grown, mined, harvested, now had to come down right by the battery
hundreds of thousands of people live very close to each other. this sort of city environment only allows people to live that close to one another because of the intensively-used infrastructure. it's infrastructure that allows this place to support this much life. that allows us to cram this many humans into this small a space. and here's what some of that infrastructure looks like tonight. you're looking at a new york city subway station. which now looks like a dirty aquarium. the subway system is the veins underneath this city that provide life. they are the special infrastructure that allows the city to separate. for the rich, the poor, and everybody in between. right now, it's swamped. you can't even get down on to the subway platforms because the water is everywhere. the army corps of engineers has been called in by officials to help drain these subway tunnels. a task that the army corps has never had to do before. the manhattan burro president is calling this the biggest disaster in the 108-year history of this subway system. before this, the only place they had ever operated was in
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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